Why many media training tutorials may have to be rewritten soon

A few days ago I came across an interesting article in politico.com, the Washington-based political publication covering the U.S. Congress, lobbying, media and the presidency. Founded in 2007 by two former Washington Post editors, it’s today seen as the leading source for analysis of the political arena in the U.S. (since 2014, they also have an EU edition, politico.eu).

The piece written by Ronald Klain, former senior advisor to Hillary for America and chief of staff to Joe Biden, focussed on the question that is (and should be) on many people’s mind right now, especially of those who make their living with consulting politicians or CEOs on their dealings with media and the broader public: How does Trump get away with breaking basically every rule media trainers teach since years, including this one: Never pick a fight with a person who buys ink by the barrel. In his recent press conference, he turned this rule upside down.

“Never pick a fight with a person who buys ink by the barrel.”

Maybe he has never heard of this rule or nobody dared to tell him, or he just doesn’t care. Whatever the reason behind is (and my sentiment is it’s the latter), it seems to be a matter of fact that many of his game-changing ways of communicating have been very effective on his way to the seat in the oval office.

Back to the column I mentioned in the beginning: it summarizes perfectly how disruptive Trump’s way of communicating is, so I recommend to read the piece in whole and reflect on the five rules Trump did turn upside down. Whether or not the Trump-style is going to be sustainable, time will tell. But if it turns out to be the case, a lot of media training tutorials need to be rewritten. That’s the good part about it: PR never goes out of business.

photo credit: swanksalot Trump PEEOTUS via photopin (license)

Owning a crisis: a tough but necessary call

More often than not, a crisis is not necessarily caused by the company. In many cases, the cause of the crisis (or issue) cannot even be controlled by the company. But still, it’s the response to the situation that matters. Failure to respond appropriately will result in negative headlines, serious flak in social media, and ultimately a damaged reputation and loss of business. Here’s a new case of double failure: It seems as if American Airlines couldn’t care less about a sickening case of groping onboard of one of its planes. Both, on the spot and in its media response. Read more